• Tijuca Forest

    The Tijuca Forest is a tropical rainforest in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is claimed to be the world’s largest urban forest, covering some 32 km², although there are sources assigning this title to the urban forest of Johannesburg, South Africa, where between 6 and 9.5 million Read more [...]

  • Recreio dos Bandeirantes

    Recreio dos Bandeirantes is both the name of a beach and neighborhood in the West Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is a recent development, with no skyscrapers, and the area also contains jungles atop rocky cliffs and hills.

  • Arpoador

    Arpoador is a region located on the southern zone of the city Rio de Janeiro, in a small peninsula between Ipanema and Copacabana. Part of its territory belongs to the neighbourhood of Ipanema, and part to Copacabana.

  • Corcovado

    Corcovado, meaning “hunchback” in Portuguese, is a mountain in central Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The 710-metre granite peak is located in the Tijuca Forest, a national park. It is sometimes confused with nearby Sugarloaf Mountain.

  • Sugarloaf Mountain

    Sugarloaf Mountain is a peak situated in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at the mouth of Guanabara Bay on a peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean. Rising 396 m above the harbor, its name is said to refer to its resemblance to the traditional shape of concentrated refined loaf Read more [...]

  • Vista Chinesa

    The Vista Chinesa is one of the belvederi of Rio de Janeiro, at the topmost of one of the roads that connect the Jardim Botânico area to the Parque Nacional & Floresta da Tijuca, known as the Estrada da Vista Chinesa.

  • Paço Imperial

    The Paço Imperial, or Imperial Palace, previously known as the Royal Palace of Rio de Janeiro and Palace of the Viceroys, is a historic building in the center of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Paço Imperial was built in the 18th century to serve as residence for Read more [...]

  • Catete Palace

    The Catete Palace is an urban mansion in Rio de Janeiro’s Flamengo neighborhood. The property stretches from Rua do Catete to Praia do Flamengo. Construction began in 1858 and ended in 1867. From 1894 to 1960, it was Brazil’s presidential palace and the site of Getúlio Vargas’ suicide.